The hidden costs of PaaS & microservice engineering innovation

[tl;dr The leap from monolithic application development into the world of PaaS and microservices highlights the need for consistent collaboration, disciplined development and a strong vision in order to ensure sustainable business value.]

The pace of innovation in the PaaS and microservice space is increasing rapidly. This, coupled with increasing pressure on ‘traditional’ organisations to deliver more value more quickly from IT investments, is causing a flurry of interest in PaaS enabling technologies such as Cloud Foundry (favoured by the likes of IBM and Pivotal), OpenShift (favoured by RedHat), Azure (Microsoft), Heroku (SalesForce), AWS, Google Application Engine, etc.

A key characteristic of all these PaaS solutions is that they are ‘devops’ enabled – i.e., it is possible to automate both code and infrastructure deployment, enabling the way to have highly automated operational processes for applications built on these platforms.

For large organisations, or organisations that prefer to control their infrastructure (because of, for example, regulatory constraints), PaaS solutions that can be run in a private datacenter rather than the public cloud are preferable, as this a future option to deploy to external clouds if needed/appropriate.

These PaaS environments are feature-rich and aim to provide a lot of the building blocks needed to build enterprise applications. But other framework initiatives, such as Spring Boot, DropWizard and Vert.X aim to make it easier to build PaaS-based applications.

Combined, all of these promise to provide a dramatic increase in developer productivity: the marginal cost of developing, deploying and operating a complete application will drop significantly.

Due to the low capital investment required to build new applications, it becomes ever more feasible to move from a heavy-weight, planning intensive approach to IT investment to a more agile approach where a complete application can be built, iterated and validated (or not) in the time it takes to create a traditional requirements document.

However, this also has massive implications, as – left unchecked – the drift towards entropy will increase over time, and organisations could be severely challenged to effectively manage and generate value from the sheer number of applications and services that can be created on such platforms. So an eye on managing complexity should be in place from the very beginning.

Many of the above platforms aim to make it as easy as possible for developers to get going quickly: this is a laudable goal, and if more of the complexity can be pushed into the PaaS, then that can only be good. The consequence of this approach is that developers have less control over the evolution of key aspects of the PaaS, and this could cause unexpected issues as PaaS upgrades conflict with application lifecycles, etc. In essence, it could be quite difficult to isolate applications from some PaaS changes. How these frameworks help developers cope with such changes is something to closely monitor, as these platforms are not yet mature enough to have gone through a major upgrade with a significant number of deployed applications.

The relative benefit/complexity trade-off between established microservice frameworks such as OSGi and easier to use solutions such as described above needs to be tested in practice. Specifically, OSGi’s more robust dependency model may prove more useful in enterprise environments than environments which have a ‘move fast and break things’ approach to application development, especially if OSGi-based PaaS solutions such as JBoss Fuse on OpenShift and Paremus ServiceFabric gain more popular use.

So: all well and good from the technology side. But even if the pros and cons of the different engineering approaches are evaluated and a perfect PaaS solution emerges, that doesn’t mean Microservice Nirvana can be achieved.

A recent article on the challenges of building successful micro-service applications, coupled with a presentation by Lisa van Gelder at a recent Agile meetup in New York City, has emphasised that even given the right enabling technologies, deploying microservices is a major challenge – but if done right, the rewards are well worth it.

Specifically, there are a number of factors that impact the success of a large scale or enterprise microservice based strategy, including but not limited to:

  • Shared ownership of services
  • Setting cross-team goals
  • Performing scrum of scrums
  • Identifying swim lanes – isolating content failure & eventually consistent data
  • Provision of Circuit breakers & Timeouts (anti-fragile)
  • Service discoverability & clear ownership
  • Testing against stubs; customer driven contracts
  • Running fake transactions in production
  • SLOs and priorities
  • Shared understanding of what happens when something goes wrong
  • Focus on Mean time to repair (recover) rather than mean-time-to-failure
  • Use of common interfaces: deployment, health check, logging, monitoring
  • Tracing a users journey through the application
  • Collecting logs
  • Providing monitoring dashboards
  • Standardising common metric names

Some of these can be technically provided by the chosen PaaS, but a lot is based around the best practices consistently applied within and across development teams. In fact, it is quite hard to capture these key success factors in traditional architectural views – something that needs to be considered when architecting large-scale microservice solutions.

In summary, the leap from monolithic application development into the world of PaaS and microservices highlights the need for consistent collaboration, disciplined development and a strong vision in order to ensure sustainable business value.
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The hidden costs of PaaS & microservice engineering innovation

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